NOIT — 5: bodies as in buildings
LAUNCH EVENT

Friday 25 October 2019 6pm–9pm Readings from 7.30pm

Please join us for the launch of NOIT — 5: bodies as in buildings guest edited by the MA Writing programme at the Royal College of Art. There will be refreshments, readings from contributors, and journals for sale.

NOIT — 5: bodies as in buildings features works by students from the MA Writing Programme at the Royal College of Art and an afterword by Brian Dillon. This collection of essays, short stories, and images explore what happens when the domestic, the home, and the body are alienated from their most basic associations and given new ones. In these works, the threshold between house and street, the distinction between the public and private, becomes porous and inexhaustibly complex.

 (NOIT — 5: bodies as in buildings  0)

Contributors: 

BRIAN DILLON

BERTIE WNEK

PHILIPPINE HAMEN

HARRIET WELCH

MOAD MUSBAHI

JAMES IRELAND

BHAWNA AGGARWAL

ROSE HIGHAM-STAINTON 

FIONA GLEN

VIVIAN YUAN XIAO

GEORGE LEITH

LUCY HOLT

ANNIE MAY DEMOZAY 

LAURA ROBERTSON

YIN YING KONG

HATTIE GIBSON

ESME BOGGIS

NINA HANZ

LUDOVICA COLACINO

BRYONY BODIMEADE

LYDIA HOUNAT

JUDITH HAGAN

GEORGE LYNCH

MAIA MAGOGA

SEAN STEED

LUCY SWAN 

DESIGNED BY: EMILY SCHOFIELD 

WITH MANY THANKS TO EMILY LABARGE, BRIAN DILLON AND TESSA PIGGOTT. 

NOIT is a creative journal published by Flat Time House. Comprising new writing and visual contributions, NOIT explores the theoretical concerns and artwork of John Latham (1921–2006), and their continued relevance. The title of the journal, NOIT comes from Latham’s reversal of the suffix ‘-tion’ which transforms verbs into nouns. Its inversion ‘noit’ suggests a transformation of nouns into verbs, a shift from talk about objects to talk about events. ‘Noit’ can also be read as ‘no it’, the sign of an activity that ‘defies its own definition by denying the validity of any given definition’ (John Latham, 1970). Flat Time House (FTHo) is a gallery, archive and space for education and residencies in Latham’s former home and studio.